My blog has moved

20 May

For all my readers, I now moved my blog over to Blogspot. You can find my newest updates of my blog on the following blogsite:

My new blog location

See you over there

beer + sausage = ?

19 May

What goes best with sausages? Right, beer. Is that maybe the reason why there is a German sausage called Beer sausage? I don’t know, but honestly, I don’t really care either. Damn it’s just the perfect combination and for that I have been busy today with my sausage making experiment number 2, “DIE BIERWURST”. Ok I got to admit I took a shortcut and based this recipe onto a similar boiled sausage called the lyoner (and I guess that one originated in France, Lyon), but the principle of both sausages is similar. Like always, I added a few more things to make the sausage more to my taste but basically it all tastes damn good with a cold wheat beer in the evening (some say in the morning it’s equally good – haha). So without further delay, here is my beer sausage recipe (with a little help from some friends).

400 g beef

300 g pork

300 g non treated pork speck, belly or back speck, both is fine

18 g curing salt

3 g pepper

1 g nutmet

1 g coriander powder

0,8 g garlic powder

10 g mustard grains

2 g ascorbic acid

6 g cutter aid / baking powder (the one that contains phosphate)

100 g crushed ice

150 g crushed walnuts

4 bell peppers

1 onion

Cut the bell pepper, the onion and the chilies in cubes, fry everything in the pan until the onion turn light brown, and let it cool down thereafter.

Peel and grind walnuts to small pieces

Cut the meat in cubes

season it with the spice mix

and freeze it until everything is nearly deep frozen (the meat should be around 1 degrees Celsius, it should be nice and hard so it can be put more easily through the meat grinder).

When the meat is cold enough, feed the seasoned meat through the meat grinder to have it mince with the fixed hole plate with the smallest holes.

Together with the crushed ice, put the minced meat in the cutter and cut everything so long until you get a real nice and smooth sausage meat mixture, it should have the consistency as in the picture below. Take care that the mixture don’t go over a temperature of 12 degrees Celsius in order to mix the fat and the proteins well together so that the meatloaf won’t lose all the juices later and turn dry. If your cutter is having a hard time to cut the mixture, maybe you want to add a little bit of iced water that I always keep ready for the case. But don’t add too much so the mixture would turn watery…

Thanks to the cutter aid, everything should be nice and sticky, you can feel the mixture between your fingers stick together. Now you can use the cooking method in order to see if everything is consistent and nice. You cook up a small amount of water, then you take one small spoon of your meatloaf mixture and drop it in the water and cook it for ten minutes. If the meat sticks nicely together and the meatball has a good consistency, you already are done by now. This test is also good to check if the seasoning is correct of if something is missing according to your taste buds.

Now I mixed the mixture with the walnut / paprika / onion mix

Now, normally, you have some sausage skins (natural or artificial is both good. I don’t have. You can also work with some other aides but I don’t have this either. So I got inventive and I was working with a baking tray and aluminum foil. I put some aluminum foil in the tray form (best to have a round one – I didn’t) and then I add the sausage mixture until nearly full.

Then I take this out, close the edges and wrap everything tightly together. Add some pressure to press everything in form, but attention, don’t put too much pressure or the foil will tear and the mixture will come out.

Now you have to heat up some water to 80 degrees Celsius. Add the sausage to the water and make sure it’s completely covered with water, then boil it at stable 80 degrees Celsius slowly for ca. 120 minutes

or if you have a meat thermometer, you want to cook everything slowly until the core of the sausage reached 80 degrees Celsius as well.

Wrap it out when its cold. Cut a slice of beer sausage and bread (add some gherkins or tomato to go with it, pour a cold beer and enjoy ;)

Some like it sour

18 May

In the following please find a recipe for a refreshing dish, especially delicious in the summer / during hot seasons, sour meat. This dish came actually back to my mind when I was staying in Dongguan where I used to visit a German snack bar that belonged to a friend of mine (cheers Andre). He used to serve beers, sausage and other German specialties. In the northern part of Germany, where my friend comes from, this dish is called Saurfleisch (sourmeat), in the southern regions of Germany where I come from; we call it Tellersuelze (aspic in a plate). According to the tales of my mom, this dish was masterfully prepared by my grandmother, apparently she was so good at it that all the friends of my grandpa used to come around when she made it. This is also the reason why, when I had this dish, alongside with a cold beer, the taste came back to my memory and I decided that I had to try and make this dish again. It is not that difficult to make, basically it is nothing else then a very tasty delicious cold meat dish. So here is the recipe for you.

For the meat dish
•    For the meat and the broth
•    1 liter of salt water
•    500 g pork (shoulder of stomach)
•    1 onion
•    1 bundle of greens
•    1 bay leave
•    125 ml vinegar
•    1 package of gelatin
•    3 – 4 whole black pepper corns
For the garnish
•    Sliced hardboiled egg
•    Sliced carrots
•    Onion rings
•    Pickled gherkin slices

Cook the salt water, wash the pork and add it to the water, get the foam from top of the water. Add the onion that you cut in quarters, add the bay leaves, the pepper corns and the greens and cook everything for 90 minutes. After this take out the meat from the broth, run the broth through a sieve and catch the liquid in a bowl. Take 375 ml of the liquid, add the vinegar, season to taste with sugar and salt. After this add the gelatin powder, bring the liquid to a boil and switch off the fire as soon as the mixture boils lightly.
Now you can let the mixture cool down and you can start to make the final dish in individual bowls, plates or in a cake forms (this is what I did so I will describe it based on what I did). I first pulled apart the meat and put it in a cake tray (leave everything light and fluffy, don’t press the meat to hard or try to compress it). Now, on top of that meat, I added the slightly cooked onion rings, the sliced gherkins and some sliced carrots (you can try other veggies if you like to, the more colorful and suit to your taste, the better for your taste). Put everything in the tray and store the tray in a fridge. Let everything cool down until it all turns hard, then slide a knife between the side of the cake tray and the sour meat so that the meat will be separated from the side cake tray. Now you put the tray upside down and carefully shake the whole meat “cake” on a board on which you can now slice some portions off.
The best way to enjoy this dish is alongside with some German style fried potatoes and some homemade mayonnaise (guess I will post these recipes soon). Here some pictures of my last “small” portion of sour meat… Enjoy.

Fleischkäse – meatloaf

30 Apr

The folks in Germany are divided in their opinion about the name of the following “recipe”, some call it Leberkäse, some call it Fleischkäse. Fact is, this meatloaf recipe does not need any liver, as the name Leberkäse would suggest, in fact, it is not even a normal cooking recipe per se, but together with the author of this blog, you can now go the extra mile and become a traditional sausage maker / butcher, yeah baby, it’s Sausage time.

Don’t be afraid, the recipe is actually easy to make. The most difficult for me was to find curing salt as this item is not sold in China. But thanks to a friend that works in a big hotel in Guangzhou, I got my hand on curing salt. Curing salt is a salt nitrite mixture which helps keep the meat nice and of rose color, don’t use it and your result will come out all grey and sad. The other things that you need and won’t find in China is cutteraid (I translated this word freely from the word Kuttermittel), which is helping the meat, while putting it through the cutter, to bind the water better and help the emulsification of the fat. But fortunately I found out that I can use baking powder instead of this cutteraid, but it’s going to be baking powder that contains phosphate. I had that as well, so I was very excited and happy to start my project “sausage factory” for some real taste of Germany.

-          Ingredients

150 g lean beef

500 g pork meat (well marbled)

200 g non treated pork speck, belly or back speck, both is fine

150 g crushed ice

-          Spice mix fort the meat:

20 g curing salt

2 ¼ g white crushed pepper

½ g nutmeg powder

½ g paprika powder

¼ g ginger powder

¼ g cardamom

-          The twist:

2 bell peppers

1 onion

2 chilies

5 g cutter aid / baking powder (the one that contains phosphate)

- Meatloaf can tuned up according to your taste buds. As we like It spicy (as a frequent reader of my blog you are very familiar with this, I like to prepare my meat loaf with a little twist. For this, I cut the bell pepper, the onion and the chilies in cubes, fry everything in the pan until the onion turn light brown, and let it cool down thereafter.

- Now I cut the meat in cubes, season it with the spice mix (see above) and freeze it until everything is nearly deep frozen (the meat should be around 1 degrees Celsius, it should be nice and hard so it can be put more easily through the meat grinder).

- When the meat is cold enough, feed the seasoned meat through the meat grinder to have it mince with the fixed hole plate with the smallest holes.

- Now, together with the crushed ice, put the minced meat in the cutter and cut everything so long until you get a real nice and smooth sausage meat mixture, it should have the consistency as in the picture below. Take care that the mixture don’t go over a temperature of 12 degrees Celsius in order to mix the fat and the proteins well together so that the meatloaf won’t lose all the juices later and turn dry. If your cutter is having a hard time to cut the mixture, maybe you want to add a little bit of iced water that I always keep ready for the case. But don’t add too much so the mixture would turn watery…

- Thanks to the cutter aid, everything should be nice and sticky, you can feel the mixture between your fingers stick together. Now you can use the cooking method in order to see if everything is consistent and nice. You cook up a small amount of water, then you take one small spoon of your meatloaf mixture and drop it in the water and cook it for ten minutes. If the meat sticks nicely together and the meatball has a good consistency, you already are done by now. This test is also good to check if the seasoning is correct of if something is missing according to your taste buds.

- Now I mixed the mixture with the paprika onion mix. In the meantime I buttered a baking form and then I pour the mixture in the baking form making sure that there are no air bubbles.

- Then I shove it in a preheated oven and bake it at 180 degrees Celsius for 12 minutes and 150 degrees Celsius for another 1 hour 20 minutes. These times are rought indications, check that the meatloaf got a golden brown top and is baked through in the middle. If you have a meat thermometer, stick it in the meatloaf and see if in the middle it should be around 70 degrees Celsius.

After you are done, you can garnish your slices of meatloaf with an egg sunny side up, slices of tomatoes, friend onions, mustard, some like to melt cheese over it and it definitely goes very well with potato salad…

Revive…

30 Apr

Freedom bird

This blog has been actively passive for quite a while, thanks to the worldwide censorship.As I am really not sure why my blog was blocked so that I could not access it, edit it or created new posts, am happy to have found a way to go around the methods of blocking and, once again, amuse you and water your mouth with further delicious recipes from the world of culinary delights.

Enjoy and welcome back dear Blog. If you guys need help and want to know how I got around the censorship, write me a PM and I will let you know.

Traditional hungarian goulash…

17 Jul

Today I am cooking an Hungarian recipe, the national Hungarian recipe to be more precise – goulash. It’s a spicy, hearty stew made from meat (there are lamb, pork, veal and horse goulash recipes) in combination with paprika and onions. It originated from Hungary and found its way into many countries, most likely via the Austrian army that used to cook this dish for its soldiers in the beginning of the 19.th century. The German army took this habit from the Austrians and used to cook this goulash soup on its stoves for its soldiers. From this the Germans derived the expression “Gulasch Kanone” = goulash canon, that still exists in the Germany language ever since. The recipe is easy to make, tasted hearty and the ingredients are easy to find in China, so its a no brainer that I cook this dish rather frequently. Here is a picture of my version and the translated my favorite recipe, which I found on this web site (the author got the recipe from his Hungarian co worker and it is my favorite goulash recipe so far): http://www.kochproben.info/data/65.php

goulash

1 kg Beef (the meat from the neck works best for me), 1 kg onions, 3-4 red chili pods (hot) cut in small pieces, Salt and pepper for seasoning, Red wine, Paprika powder, 3 diced bell peppers (my addition), ca. ½ liter Meat stock (you need enough of it to cover all the ingridients)

Goulash seasoning:
Marjoram, Cumming, Lemon zest, 3 cloves of garlic

Cut the meat in cubes, the onions in stripes. Now you heat up oil in a pan and fry the onions in it until they are golden brown, then you add the chili pods (if you like it spicy, add the seeds inside the pods, if you cannot eat too spicy, maybe you want to reduce the amount of chili to two pods). Now you add the meat cubes, season them with salt and pepper and let them brown from all sides equally. Doing this the meat will emit juices, don’t throw them away but continue to cook the meat until the juices are completely reduced and the meat is starting to fry again. In the meantime we prepare the Goulash season by grinding the marjoram, Cumming, lemon zest and garlic. Now we are adding the diced bell peppers, a generous dose of paprika powder and the goulash seasoning to the meat. Let everything fry up shortly (don’t let it fry for too long or it will turn bitter) and right after we deglaze it with a generous portion of red wine. We stir everything in the pan, especially everything that sticks to the bottom of the pan so that it can cook now evenly with the red wine. We let the red wine reduce now before we are adding the meat stock up to the level so the whole meat is submerged in the broth.
Now we let everything simmer on small heat for 1.5 to 2 hours (the longer you cook it, the better and richer the sauce will be). I even think that the taste is best when I reheat the goulash on the second or the third day after cooking it. You know that everything is cooked through at the moment when you are able to split the meat effortless with a spoon, without having to add too much pressure, which is when the meat is ready. Serve the goulash with Spätzle, Noodles or Bavarian style dumplings. Enjoy…

So what’s the real origin of Chinese food?

15 Jun

Here is an interested food related topic I wanted to found in the web. First I was not sure if I really want to publish it as I at this stage, without having read the book, I can not back up what the author claims in this article (I even would like to express my point of view by saying that I do not believe that most of the Chinese food is simply copied) but it made me interested to buy the book and I was laughing out loud while reading the article about the book so I decided to reprint this article here so you all can have a laugh with me.

——————————

If the world’s first gastro-etymologist is to be believed, the majority of China’s beloved culinary creations may well be the 5,000-year-old culture’s oldest surviving knock-offs.

Shanzhai Nation: How China Fed and Misled the World “chronicles one professor’s foray into the deepest and darkest corners of conspiracy and corruption, dating all the back to the Yellow Emperor himself,” according to a book review in The New York Times.

Written and researched by Phillip Nam Ngyuen, a French-born Vietnamese professor of gastronomy, the book was inspired by the rhetorical title of a 2008 TED Talk, “Who is General Tso, and why are we eating his chicken?”

“That got me thinking,” said Nguyen in an interview with China Daily Show. “Who is General Tso? Why are we eating his goddamn chicken? I couldn’t ignore those hard-hitting questions.”

Nguyen’s book begins with China’s well-known historical lack of innovation and creativity, and moves on to expose dish after dish as culinary copycats, each chapter garnished with impressive sources, dates and statistics. From hot pot to hundun, and dumplings to dim sum, no Chinese “creation” is free from Nguyen’s investigative eye.
[seacucumber]

According to Nguyen, sea cucumbers were first introduced to the Chinese during a 1967 state dinner with Klingons

“Everyone knows hot pot comes from 12th-century Mongolia,” said Ngyuen, “but most would be surprised to learn that Kungpao chicken, or in it’s butchered Chinese form, gongbao jiding, is a ripped-off version of Chicken Gumbo, the beloved Cajun dish first masterminded by Bantu-speaking African slaves in Louisiana in 1802, and subsequently copied by a ‘visiting Chinaman of Kwei-chow origin named T’ing P’ow-jun,’ according to police records published in The Picayune in 1842.”

“Roast dog?” Nguyen continued, “Korean. Chuan’r? Persian. Baozi? Hell, baozi was invented by the Germans. Ever heard of the hamburger?”

And as for General Tso’s Chicken?

“That was created by the Oxford-educated Tibetan military scholar, General George Tsozarayim,” said Nguyen. “And we all know that Tibet is—oh, to hell with it, let’s just pretend that General Tso’s chicken is ‘Chinese.’”

Nguyen’s book is currently banned on the Mainland. State agencies remain mum on the veracity of his findings or the implications of widespread historical fraud.

“Five thousand years of history and you can only come up with four fuc*%($ inventions?” said Nguyen. “I think I may have just found the topic of my next book.”

(By MAN MANCHI Culinary Correspondent China Daily Show)

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